Back to blog

Quarantining with Fibroid Symptoms

Acessa Health | March 31, 2020

We know dealing with fibroid symptoms is tough even when you’re not in quarantine. That’s why we’re talking about how to manage them when you’re stuck inside.

Okay – so assuming you live on Earth, you know what’s happening in the world right now. Restaurants are closed, sports are suspended, stores are empty, and people across the nation are self-quarantining.

Unfortunately, everyone is being affected by the spread of COVID-19. For our healthcare workers it means working overtime and distancing themselves from their families. For others it means staying in & spending weekends dusting off old board games. Sadly for women with fibroid symptoms, it means cancelled surgery dates, postponed Doctors appointments, and too much time at home to focus on your symptoms.

While we understand why hospitals are postponing elective procedures, we know how incredibly frustrated you must feel. Know that we see you, and we’re here for you.
That’s why we came up with these tips to help you treat your symptoms & stay in a positive frame of mind when you can’t leave the house.

Make a List

It can feel a little overwhelming when you’re stuck in the house all day. Whether you’re working from home or just staying in, it’s easy to get distracted. Start your day by making a list of the things you want to accomplish. It doesn’t have to be long but writing things down will help keep you focused and can help distract from some of your pain or discomfort from your pesky fibroids.

While you’re at it, write down a few things that you’re grateful for and say them out loud. It’s a really easy way to get your day started with a positive mind frame. Some things we like to have on our list:

  • My Family
  • My bed
  • Friends to Facetime with
  • Extra time to read
  • My fur babies

Heating Pads

Speaking of heating pads. Yeah, we know you’ve heard this one before. But hear us out – TWO AT THE SAME TIME. Try using one on your belly, and one on your lower back. Then pop open your favorite book or turn on your favorite show and try to focus on that instead. Here is a list of some of the top heating pads online:

Do Yoga

If you’re feeling up to it, it’s been proven that one hour of yoga a week is enough to reduce period cramps.[1] There are a lot of great YouTube yoga classes you can watch to get yourself started. Also, added benefit, no one will see how inflexible you are, other than the dog.

  • For Beginners
    1. This video is a great choice if you’ve never tried Yoga before. Super simple, but still leaves you feeling good.
  • Try this one if you have pelvic pain
    1. This routine is meant to focus on your pelvic floor. If you check out the reviews, you’ll see it’s been helpful to many women experiencing period pain.
  • Try this if you’re feeling super stressed
    1. Turn off the news and turn on this Yoga session! Seriously. It will help ease your mind AND tone your body. And we all need a little of that right now.

Take a Hot Bath

Soak in your tub with your favorite candle burning and some good music. Relaxation is important for both your mental and physical health, plus the heat can relax your muscles if you’re having cramps. Another trick – drop a couple of your favorite essential oils in your bath. Your skin will be moisturized, and the calming properties of the oil will reduce the stress and anxiety of dealing with your symptoms. Here are a few essentials we love to get that spa like feeling during a bath:

  • Bath Bombs
    • Bath bombs are such a fun twist on the classic bubble bath. Not only do they smell amazing, they make your bathwater so pretty. One of our favorites is this lavender and ylang ylang bomb from Lush. It’s made of only natural and safe synthetic ingredients and is designed to sooth stressed bodies.
  • Bath Pillows
    • You need a bath pillow. Okay maybe not need, but if you really want to step up your bath game, this is the way.
  • Essential Oils
    • Essential Oils are having a serious moment right now, and it’s no wonder. They can be used in so many ways! Our personal fave is adding a few drops of lavender oil to a hot bath. Some brands can seem a little pricey, but honestly they last forever. All you need is one or two drops to see the effects. This article gives some great information on finding the oil that’s right for you!
  • Bath Salts
    • Epsom salts are known for soothing muscles cramps and are a great add to your bath. Dr Teals has an awesome selection of choices & is super affordable.

Eat Clean

There hasn’t been a ton of evidence on the link between diet and fibroids, but studies have suggested that women with fibroids generally have a diet high in red meat, but women with diets high in vegetables & fruits showed a smaller risk of fibroids. Plus we all know how much better we feel when we’re eating right, so since you’re staying in, look up some fun healthy recipes from Pinterest to try! We found a few to help you get started down that Pinterest recipe rabbit hole:

We know the world seems like a scary place right now. We can’t begin to guess when the quarantines will end, or when Acessa procedures will be rescheduled. We don’t even know when we’ll find another roll of toilet paper in the stores. What we do know is the gang at Acessa is here for you during this crazy time as a safe and positive space to come share your symptoms, thoughts, questions – whatever it is, we’re here.

If you have any questions about the Acessa procedure, a cancellation of your surgery, or other resources to help you with your fibroids, feel free to call our patient hotline: 833-564-8333.

SOURCES:

  1. Yang, N.-Y., & Kim, S.-D. (2016). Effects of a Yoga Program on Menstrual Cramps and Menstrual Distress in Undergraduate Students with Primary Dysmenorrhea: A Single-Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine22(9), 732–738. doi: 10.1089/acm.2016.0058
  2. Sparic, R., Mirkovic, L., Malvasi, A., & Tinelli, A. (2016). Epidemiology of Uterine Myomas: A Review. International journal of fertility & sterility9(4), 424–435. https://doi.org/10.22074/ijfs.2015.4599

LI-07-0086