Frequently Asked Questions

  • Is the Acessa procedure covered by insurance?
  • Can Acessa be used to treat any type of fibroid in any location?
  • What should I expect the day of the Acessa procedure?
  • How long does recovery take after the Acessa procedure?
  • If the fibroids are not physically removed, how does the Acessa procedure work?
  • How long does the outpatient Acessa procedure take?
  • How safe is the Acessa procedure? Is it clinically proven?
  • What are the typical results from the Acessa procedure?
  • Will patients feel symptom relief after the Acessa procedure?
  • How long has this option been available, and why has my doctor never heard of the Acessa procedure?
  • There are no physicians in my area who offer the procedure, what should I do?
  • Many insurance companies cover the procedure.

    If you are a patient who is concerned about your insurance covering Acessa, have experienced an insurance denial or have been denied access to the Acessa procedure through your commercial or Medicaid plan, we have resources for you.

    If you have a question you can call our Insurance Support Line: 886-473-4895 or email us at Insurance@AcessaHealth.com.

    Acessa can be used to treat almost all types of symptomatic uterine fibroids, including subserosal, intramural, transmural, and submucosal.1 Acessa should not be used on non-uterine masses.

    Prep and Access—You are prepped and brought into the operating room for anesthesia. Your physician makes two small incisions—one in your belly button, one below your bikini line—and inserts a tiny camera and ultrasound into each incision.

    Visualize—Your physician precisely locates each fibroid with the Acessa ultrasound probe and guidance mapping, allowing a full view of your uterus.

    Deploy—Next, your physician deploys the tip of the Acessa handpiece into the fibroid while preserving healthy uterine tissue.

    Treat—The physician deploys controlled heat through the Acessa handpiece to destroy the fibroid tissue. The physician repeats this process until every targeted fibroid is fully treated.

    Finish—Once the procedure is complete, your physician stitches the small incisions on the skin. Ta da!

    Recover—You will wake up in the recovery room. Most patients get cleared to go home within two hours. Women typically feel ready to return to work and daily activities after 4-5 days. In terms of when you will see symptom relief—this is a hot topic. It depends on how big the fibroid is and what symptoms you’re experiencing.

    In clinical studies, patients were able to return back to work and normal activity within 4-5 days.33, 34, 35 Results may vary.

    As a reminder, Acessa is a treatment for benign (non-cancerous) symptomatic fibroids. If patients are at risk for cancer, or malignancy, Acessa is not the appropriate treatment.

    Studies show that fibroids do not have to be completely removed to resolve symptoms.1, 36 Treating the fibroid cells so they shrink and stop putting pressure on the uterus may help to resolve symptoms. The data in the IDE clinical study showed even a 45.1% average shrinkage in fibroid volume can result in significant improvement in heavy periods, pelvic pain and bulk.1 To summarize, Acessa works by heating the fibroid cells from the inside out, not by removing the fibroid. Cell tissues die when they reach a certain temperature. Acessa is designed to heat the fibroid tissue to the point that the tissue dies. The dead fibroid tissue shrinks and shrivels over time. The dead fibroid tissue is not harmful. It gets absorbed by the body, just like any dead tissue cell.33

    Each procedure varies in length based on the number and size of fibroids. Typically, the entire procedure from anesthesia to waking up lasts 1-2 hours.37 It may take longer for more fibroids or complications. Results may vary.

    Radiofrequency ablation has been used for decades. The idea for laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation (Lap RFA) to treat fibroids, or the Acessa procedure, was first conceived by Dr. Bruce Lee in 1999.38 The original Acessa System was FDA cleared in November 2012. Since 2012, physicians have performed over 3,500 procedures with over 48 publications.39 The newest, most advanced technology, the Acessa ProVu system, was cleared in 2018.

    “Our analysis indicates that Lap RFA is associated with low complication rates, minimal EBL, and low reintervention rates. In addition, patients reported major improvement in their HRQL and symptom severity scores compared to reports of more traditional interventions, such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, and UAE.” – Havryliuk Meta Analysis JSLS 2017

    The results of the Overall Treatment Effect Survey of the pivotal study of 124 patients showed that 94% of the subjects responded that they were very satisfied, moderately satisfied, or somewhat satisfied with the treatment. At 12-months post treatment, 98% of the subjects reported that they would probably or definitely recommend the procedure to their friends with the same health problem. When asked about the effectiveness of the treatment, at least 94% of the subjects responded that the treatment had been somewhat, moderately, or very effective in eliminating their symptoms.

    Most patients report they have significantly lighter periods and alleviated pelvic pain and pressure. Often patients who experience “bloating”—looking pregnant having a distended abdomen from the fibroids, report reduced or eliminated bulk symptoms.1 However, results may vary.

    To hear directly from patients, check out our video library

    The Acessa procedure is able to resolve many of the common fibroid symptoms including: extreme periods, stomach swelling and bloating, leg and back pain, stomach and pelvic pain, digestive issues, anemia, pain during sex, frequent urination.

    Based on our clinical data, the average reduction in menstrual blood loss was 87 mL compared to baseline periods after 3 months and reduced even further to 103.6 mL by 6 months.1

    Most patients see the greatest effects 3-6 months after Acessa.1, 34 However, results may vary.

    To hear directly from patients, check out our video library

    Radiofrequency ablation has been used for decades. The idea for laparoscopic radiofrequency ablation (Lap RFA) to treat fibroids, or the Acessa procedure, was first conceived by Dr. Bruce Lee in 1999.38 The original Acessa System was FDA cleared in November 2012. Since 2012, physicians have performed over 3,500 procedures with over 48 publications.39 The newest, most advanced technology, the Acessa ProVu system, was cleared in 2018.

    We are on a mission to give women more options. Thankfully, more and more physicians are learning about the Acessa procedure, and we are growing daily.

    Acessa are expanding daily. Many women travel for the procedure. Some physicians are accustomed to working with patients who are traveling. If you are interested in traveling for the procedure, we recommend reaching out to any Acessa trained physician’s office to learn more about their policies and your insurance coverage in that city, or to call the patient hotline at 800-992-4359.

    Please feel free to call us at 866-402-6357 or email us at info@acessaprocedure.com if you have any other questions.