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Fibroids After 50 (Why They Don’t Always Disappear!)

 

Fibroids, also known as leiomyomas, are estrogen-dependent. As a result, they typically grow and present symptoms during a woman’s reproductive years, when the ovaries are active. Once the ovaries stop naturally producing estradiol (estrogen)—usually in her mid-50’s— a woman is said to have entered menopause. Logically, the drop in estrogen production that occurs in menopause would cause any uterine fibroids to gradually shrink, and this is typically the case. Fibroids and their accompanying symptoms often diminish after menopause. But what if they don’t?

There are a number of reasons why a woman would continue to have difficulty with a fibroid tumor during this stage of her life: stimulation from exogenous estrogen production (i.e. hormone replacement therapy), cancerous tumors, or malignant uterine/fibroid changes are a few possible causes.

Hormone replacement is commonly prescribed for menopausal women to reduce the uncomfortable symptoms that result from estrogen-deficiency, including hot flushes, vaginal dryness, mood fluctuations, and reduced desire for sex. Estrogen deficiency can also compromise bone health, increasing the risk of fractures; adding supplemental estrogens back into the body can help maintain a woman’s bone strength after menopause.

Replacing estrogen with hormone therapy can drastically increase the quality of life for many women in menopause. However, the risks of hormone replacement can sometimes outweigh the benefits, the recurrence or worsening of fibroid symptoms being one example. Dr. Donald Galen, OB-GYN and former Surgical Director at the Reproductive Science Center of the San Francisco Bay Area explains, “if fibroids are present, the addition of estrogens will generally stimulate fibroid growth, or minimize fibroid regression which otherwise would occur during natural menopause.” A study by Lamminen et al. that compared the activity of fibroids in pre- and post-menopausal women found just that: proliferative activity was low in the post-menopausal subjects who weren’t receiving hormone replacement, whereas those women who were receiving hormones had “fibroid proliferative activity equal to premenopausal women”. Dr. Galen also advises patients of other risks related to hormone therapy, as well. He explains, “estrogen can increase health risks, such as an increased risk of blood clots, increased risk of breast hyperplasia/cancer, and increased risk of endometrial hyperplasia and/or endometrial cancer.”

Hormone replacement therapy isn’t the only reason women see a persistence in fibroid symptoms after menopause. Malignant changes in existing fibroids or the emergence of new, cancerous tumors (“neoplasia”) on the uterus or reproductive organs can produce symptoms like those of benign leiomyomas.  Dr. Galen advises, “as a precaution, any woman with an increase in uterine growth/size and/or post-menopausal uterine bleeding should be evaluated to rule-out malignant uterine/fibroid changes.”

 

 

SOURCES:

Burbank, Fred. Fibroids, Menstruation, Childbirth and Evolution: The Fascinating Story of Uterine Blood Vessels. Tucson, AZ: Wheatmark, 2009. 93. Print.

Lamminen, S. et al.”Proliferative activity of human uterine leiomyomacells as measured by automatic image analysis”,Gynecologic and Obstetetric Investigation. 1992; 34:111-114

 

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The 5 Biggest Myths Surrounding Uterine Fibroids

 

shutterstock_325530068Fibroids are the most common type of pelvic tumor among women of reproductive age. Despite their prevalence, however, fibroids are widely misunderstood. A number of popular misconceptions, in particular, create confusion for women with fibroids who are trying to understand their condition and treatment options. To clear up some of this confusion, we’re breaking down five of the most common myths surrounding fibroids.

 

MYTH: If you have fibroids, you will experience symptoms like heavy menstrual bleeding and pain.
As common as the condition is, researchers estimate that between 50-80% of women with fibroids will experience no fibroid symptoms at all. Many women with asymptomatic fibroids never even know that they have the condition. And, because fibroid tumors are almost always benign, women who aren’t experiencing symptoms may opt to forgo treating their fibroids.

MYTH: A routine ultrasound will detect any uterine fibroids that are present.
If fibroids are suspected, the first diagnostic tool gynecologists employ to confirm the suspicion is transvaginal ultrasound. However, this imaging method doesn’t always reveal all existing fibroids. The size and location of uterine fibroids varies greatly, and extremely small fibroids, submucosal fibroids, and small fibroids that are hidden behind larger tumors, aren’t always detectable through a routine pelvic ultrasound. For clearer visualization of the tumors, physicians frequently rely on laparoscopic ultrasound, which requires inserting a scope through the vagina and into the abdominal cavity provides. Research has shown that laparoscopic ultrasound can detect up to twice as many fibroids as transvaginal ultrasound.

MYTH: Fibroid tumors will become cancerous.
Uterine fibroids, also known as leiomyomas, are almost always benign: in women of reproductive age, less than 0.01% of (removed) fibroids become cancerous. While fibroids typically shrink after menopause, those that do appear in post-menopausal women may be the cancerous type, called leiosarcomas. It’s important to note, however, that – regardless of age – simply having fibroids does not increase a woman’s chances of developing cancer in her reproductive organs.

MYTH: Endometrial ablation is a method of treating fibroids
Endometrial ablation (EA) is a commonly used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. The technique entails destroying the layer of tissue that lines the uterus known as the endometrium, preventing new tissue from growing and thereby reducing or eliminating menstrual bleeding. While you may have heard EA discussed in the context of fibroids, it is not, in fact a fibroid treatment. The destruction of fibroids that can occur with EA is incidental, and is not likely complete. In such cases, the ablated fibroids will often regrow, since subserosal fibroids – the type that grow inside the uterus and are therefore subject to destruction during EA – often originate below the endometrium layer.

MYTH: If left untreated, fibroids will continue to grow throughout a woman’s lifetime.
Fibroid growth is fueled by estrogen. Accordingly, fibroids will grow and shrink in response to the body’s hormone fluctuations. Pregnant women often experience rapid growth in existing fibroids and may develop new fibroids during pregnancy, due to the heightened levels of estrogen that their bodies are producing. Conversely, fibroids typically shrink after menopause, because the ovaries have stopped producing estrogen. (Post-menopausal women undergoing hormone replacement therapy can expect the opposite to occur, however, since they are artificially replacing the missing estrogen.) Although fibroids do tend to disappear naturally after menopause, pre-menopausal women who are suffering with symptoms of uterine fibroids may not want to wait.

When fibroids are interfering with the quality of life, it’s advisable to discuss treatment options with a gynecologist. With a plethora of treatments available to women with fibroids, including uterine conserving methods like Acessa Procedure, it’s not necessary to endure long-term suffering!

 

SOURCES:

American Society for Reproductive Medicine, “What Are Fibroids? Fact Sheet”, Resources, ReproductiveFacts.org: rev. 2012. Retrieved Aug 26, 2015, from http://www.reproductivefacts.org/FACTSHEET_What_are_Fibroids/

Levine, D.J. et al. “Sensitivity of Myoma Imaging Using Laparoscopic Ultrasound Compared With Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Transvaginal Ultrasound”, Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology. Nov/Dec 2013; Vol 20(6): 770-4

Burbank, Fred. Fibroids, Menstruation, Childbirth and Evolution: The Fascinating Story of Uterine Blood Vessels. Tucson, AZ: Wheatmark, 2009. 135. Print.

 

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