Posts

Fibroids Are Not Color Blind

Over the years, researchers have examined the epidemiological connection between a wide variety of patient characteristics and the occurrence of uterine fibroids, seeking to identify risk factors. Age, weight, diet, geographic location, lifestyle factors like cigarette smoking, medical conditions, and history of childbirth have all been studied, and many have been correlated with fibroids in one way or another. But time after time, study after study, one characteristic has stood out as a major indicator of fibroid risk: race. And the conclusion that researchers have consistently reached is this: uterine fibroids (also known as leiomyomas) disproportionately affect women of color.

Certain, specific differences have been seen in the cases of black women: research shows that, in comparison to white women, black women tend to develop a larger number of fibroids and experience more fibroid-related symptoms. A study published in 2013 by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine reported that, “African-American women had substantially more fibroids” with an average of 9.9 fibroids compared to the Caucasian subjects’ average of 4.5 fibroids. Additionally, Weiss et al. conducted a multi-ethnic, multisite, longitudinal study of 3,302 women ages 42-52 and concluded that “previously diagnosed leiomyomas were presenting symptoms more frequently in African-American woman than Caucasian women (85% vs. 63%)”.

The racial disparity in fibroid occurrence isn’t fully understood. The research that exists mostly defines the relative risk of the condition in terms of black and white. Obviously, black and white women aren’t the only ones affected by uterine fibroids. While very little data exists on the differences in susceptibility and symptoms between other ethnicities, a 2011 study conducted by the U.S. Armed Forces identified the relative risk of fibroids for multiple ethnic groups. The study looked at the population of active military women who were diagnosed with fibroids between 2001 and 2010: 11,931 cases were recorded. The researchers concluded that, relative to the white, non-Hispanic population, the risk of fibroids was slightly higher (1.1 times) for Hispanics and Asians/Pacific Islanders, and slightly lower (.9 times) for American Indians/Alaskan Natives. By comparison, African American women were 4.4 times more likely to have the same diagnosis, and women in the ethnic category of “Other” had almost double (1.9 times) the incidence of fibroids. These findings are depicted in the graph below.

Fibroids--race_MSMRgraph

As of now, there are no clear answers to explain why symptoms and presentation of uterine fibroids are different in women of color. However, the connection between fibroids and race is certainly a topic of interest to researchers, physicians and fibroid patients alike, and one that continues to be the subject of medical research.

Sources:

  1. Schwartz, S.M. “Epidemiology of uterine leiomyomata”, Clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology. June 2001; Vol.44(2):316-26
  2. Moorman, P.G. et al. “Comparison of characteristics of fibroids in African American and white women undergoing premenopausal hysterectomy”, Fertility & Sterility, March 2013; Vol.99(3)768-776>
  3. Weiss, G. et al. “Racial differences in women who have a hysterectomy for benign conditions”, Women’s Health Issues, May-June 2009; Vol.19(3):202-10
  4. Eltoukhi, H.M. et al. “The health disparities of uterine fibroid tumors for African American women: a public health issue”, American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, March 2014; Vol.210(3)
  5. “Uterine Fibroids, Active Component Females, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2010”, Medical Surveillance Monthly Report, December 2011; Vol.18(12):10-13

LI-00-0419-A