“Won’t My Fibroids Go Away On Their Own?” Weighing the Wait-And-See Option

If you’ve done any Internet research on fibroids at all, you’ve probably encountered some mention of a woman’s fibroids disappearing on their own after menopause. It’s most likely a true story. Indeed, as the body’s natural production of estrogen declines in menopause, the estrogen-fueled fibroid tumors, also called leiomyomas, will follow suit—at least, in theory.

There are a number of reasons why a woman would continue to see the persistence or even growth of her fibroids after menopause: the reintroduction of estrogen with hormone replacement therapy or malignant changes in the tumor (cancer known as leiomyosarcoma) are two possible explanations for the continuation of symptoms. Hormone replacement, in particular, is commonly necessitated when a woman’s menopausal symptoms impact her quality of life, but the need isn’t foreseeable in pre-menopausal years. In such cases, fibroids that may have otherwise gone away naturally could continue to present problematic symptoms far later in life than anticipated.

Still, the natural disappearance of fibroids is a viable possibility. For many women, this raises the question, if fibroids will potentially shrink or even disappear on their own after menopause, should a pre-menopausal woman take steps to have them treated, or should she simply wait and see? The urgency for treatment typically depends on the severity of symptoms, according to Dr. Donald Galen, OB-GYN and former Surgical Director at the Reproductive Science Center of the San Francisco Bay Area.

The degree to which women experience common fibroid symptoms like heavy menstrual bleeding, pelvic pain and pressure, and urinary frequency varies substantially. For many women, fibroid symptoms are more than inconvenient: they can interfere with all aspects of her life and relationships. When symptoms are debilitating, a woman may want to consider treating her fibroids sooner, rather than later. With many available treatment options, including minimally invasive options like Acessa Procedure, treating any existing fibroids will improve her quality of life.

Women whose symptoms are less severe, on the other hand, may choose to delay treatment. “If symptoms are minimal,” Dr. Galen explains, “it is reasonable to follow these patients and as they progress in menopause…their fibroids and symptoms should progressively diminish and thus no other treatment may be needed.” Stressing the importance of the patient’s participation in the decision-making progress, he adds, “this decision is made by the woman, with counseling from her physician as to all available risks, treatments, alternatives, etc.”

Sources:

  1. Burbank, Fred. Fibroids, Menstruation, Childbirth and Evolution: The Fascinating Story of Uterine Blood Vessels. Tucson, AZ: Wheatmark, 2009. 135. Print.
  2. American Society for Reproductive Medicine, “What Are Fibroids”, Resources, ReproductiveFacts.org: 2011. Retrieved April 6 2015, from http://www.reproductivefacts.org/FACTSHEET_What_are_Fibroids/

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