Fibroids’ Psychological Toll

Fibroids hurt. The pain isn’t just physical: the psychological toll that comes with symptomatic fibroids is profound. In a 2014 study on the emotional impact of fibroids, researchers at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine surveyed 48 women who had diagnosed, symptomatic uterine fibroids. The researchers found that the majority of those women had a “significant emotional response to their fibroids, ranging from general worry and concern to fear, anxiety, sadness, and depression”. More than half of the study’s participants reported feeling as though they had no control over their fibroids, mostly due to the difficulty of managing and predicting the heavy menstrual flow that is characteristic of the condition. The majority felt disempowered and possessed a “negative self-image”. The women also frequently expressed “concern over appearing pregnant, overweight, and less attractive”. Many of them expressed that the insecurities made intimacy with a partner difficult.

Despite both the physical and emotional suffering that the condition engenders, the prevailing attitude among women with fibroids seems to be that the condition is one to simply be endured. They resign themselves to “toughing it out”. Why would they voluntarily suffer? The answer partly lies in the woman’s perception of normalcy surrounding her experience with fibroids, according to researchers. M.S. Ghant et al. discovered in their 2014 study that many of the women they surveyed had delayed seeking a diagnosis for their heavy menstrual bleeding because they believed what they were experiencing was essentially a normal burden of womanhood. Even after receiving a diagnosis of fibroids, the researchers reported, many did not seek treatment: instead, they frequently minimized their suffering and “expressed that they were ‘just dealing’ with their fibroids”.

Fear about invasive treatments and the consequences of procedures like hysterectomy are clearly major deterrents for many fibroid sufferers who would otherwise seek treatment. Fortunately, new, outpatient treatment options like the Acessa Procedure offer women with fibroids alternatives to hysterectomy and invasive surgery. Evidence suggests that treating fibroids through a minimally invasive procedure of this nature leads to improved quality of life and psychological wellbeing.

A 2013 study by Guido et al. examined the impact of fibroid treatment via radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (also known as Acessa Procedure) on various aspects of patient’s wellbeing. Using the participant’s responses to follow-up questionnaires at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post-procedure, the research team measured improvements in multiple quality-of-life factors, including: Concern, Activities, Energy/Mood, Control, Sexual Function, and Self-Consciousness. They concluded that the women participants, “showed significant improvement in their symptom severity and health-related quality of life [in the first] 3 months post treatment”. Moreover, the effects seemed to last; the researchers noted that the improvements they observed, represented in the graph below, were “sustained over 2 years, accompanied by a low rate of re-intervention (4.8%)”.

As awareness of minimally invasive treatment options increases, perhaps the painful emotions like fear, anxiety, and depression that commonly precede treatment decisions will be alleviated, and “toughing it out” will no longer be perceived as necessary. Moreover, for those women who take the next step of treating, rather than enduring, their fibroids through a minimally invasive procedure, the outlook for an improved emotional, physical, and mental state is a positive one.

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SOURCES:

  1. Ghant, M.S. et al. “An altered perception of normal: a qualitative assessment of women’s experiences with symptomatic uterine fibroids”, Fertility & Sterility. Sept 2014; Vol. 102(3):255.
  2. Ghant, M.S. et al. “Beyond the physical: a qualitative assessment of the emotional burden of symptomatic uterine fibroids on women’s mental health”, Fertility & Sterility. Sept 2014; Vol. 102(3):329.
  3. Guido et al. “Radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation of fibroids: a prospective, clinical analysis of two years’ outcome from the Halt trial”, Health and Quality of Life Outcomes 2013 11:139.

 

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